fred

Cisco and IETF 93 in Prague

Posted by fred Jul 17, 2015

Hello from Prague, where the IETF will be next week. Acting on a request, I did some statistical massaging of the Internet Draft directory and the IETF meeting site, to see what Cisco was working on in IETF 93 [http://www.ietf.org/meeting/93/index.html ].

 

The IETF community is fairly large and sprawling - and frequently hidden in various ways. In the Internet Draft directory, I find a total of 2780 different email addresses. At Cisco, for every person who is writing drafts in the IETF (all 256 of them, at this writing), we probably have a team of ten more that she or he is working with and a larger community of interest; if that holds elsewhere, the IETF community might easily be on the order of 30,000 people worldwide. These people obviously include vendors like Cisco; it also includes many of our customers, the operators that run networks of various descriptions from backbone transit to broadband access and mobile networks, and some of the larger enterprise and academic campus and research networks. As such, it also includes academics, researchers, and frankly anyone else touched by the Internet. It also includes regulators, who come to learn about the network and its technology (The Internet Society Fellowship to the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) Programme | Internet Society).

 

A subset of them show up in meetings like this one, three times a year, to work through the nitty-gritty issues of standards and ancillary documentation embodied in RFCs. At this meeting, per the IETF web site, about 1500-1700 will congregate in Prague next week. The one continent not represented directly will be Antarctica. Of those, at least 120 will come from Cisco, and probably more.

 

As of July 17, there are 2194 posted Internet Drafts. Cisco employees contributed to 548 of them. Of the 2194, 602 are new drafts since March, when we last met; 113 of those new drafts came from Cisco employees. The IETF has 134 working groups (http://datatracker.ietf.org/wg/) organized into seven areas, and the IRTF has 9 Active IRTF research groups. As one might imagine, managing that organization requires a small army of people. Cisco employees are part of that, with 25 people filling 32 positions - working group chairs, IESG, IAB, and the IANA Stewardship Transition Coordination Group.

 

What Working and Research Groups? What are we doing there? Cisco employees contribute to 85 working groups and five research groups. Counting Internet Drafts contributed to working groups, we have a few broad areas, and a number of lesser interests. As shown in the graphic, these are largely in BGP and enterprise routing, IPv6 and IPv6 services such as segment routing, network management and OAM, traffic engineering including MPLS, and technologies related to conferencing - voice, video, SIP, and so on. We also look pretty hard at security issues, QoS, and traffic management. In essence, where you find our customers, you'll find us. You'll also find us looking ahead to the technologies we think they will need next, often shoulder to shoulder.

 

Screen Shot 2015-07-17 at 6.06.08 PM.png

The OpenDaylight Summit is July 27-31, 2015 in Santa Clara, CA. Advertised as being where the industry meets to collaborate on networking’s de facto open SDN platform, it brings together users, developers and the SDN community to discuss, debate and demonstrate the latest technologies and trends in open SDN. Not surprisingly, Cisco DevNet will be there, and Cisco is a Platinum sponsor of the event. If you are into SDN, DevOps, and/or Open Source, you should consider joining us.

 

On Tuesday and Wednesday, Charles Eckel and Giles Heron present tools Cisco DevNet are developing to support ODL development and test. Check out the session listing in the Demo Theater and mark your schedules today.

 

Can’t wait to get started or won’t be able to join us in person at the summit - no worries, you can access DevNet anytime, anywhere. You are encouraged to browse the entire site on your own, but let me call your attention to a few things likely to be of immediate interest:

1) Open Source Dev Center - Your source for open source at Cisco. It highlights Cisco contributions to open source projects, such as OpenDaylight and OpenStack, and how such projects manifest themselves in our products and solutions.

2) OpenDaylight DevVM - Within this VM you will find all of the tools, utilities and code you need to build and explore ODL and the ODL based Cisco Open SDN Controller (COSC), which is Cisco´s commercial distribution of ODL.

3)  Developer Communities - Share your thoughts, find helpful info and tips, and ask your burning questions within the various communities (e.g. Open Source, Dev VM)

I also encourage you to tell us about sessions you are giving or excited about attending, or sessions you would like to see in the future.

We look forward to seeing your at the ODL Summit and in DevNet.

T minus 10 days until the Hackathon is officially underway. Registration is completely full and preparation is in full swing.

 

In case you missed previous announcements, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is holding a Hackathon at IETF 93 to encourage developers to discuss, collaborate and develop utilities, ideas, sample code and solutions that show practical implementations of IETF standards. The stated goals are to:

  • Advance the pace and relevance of IETF standards activities by bringing the speed and collaborative spirit of open source development into the IETF
  • Attract developers and young people, introducing them to the community and getting them interested and contributing to the IETF

Cisco DevNet, which brought the first ever IETF Hackathon at IETF 92 in Dallas, is fully committed to an even more successful event at IETF 93 in Prague.

 

When: Saturday July 18 and Sunday July 19

Where: Hilton Prague, Chez Louis

Sponsored By: Cisco DevNet

 

More information can be found here: http://ietf.org/hackathon/93-hackathon.html

Registration is full, but you can still keep up to date and contribute by subscribing to: https://www.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/hackathon

 

The list of technologies covered has expanded to include the following:

  • BIER (Bit Index Explicit Replication)
  • DANE / DNS Privacy / DNSSEC
  • DHCPv6 (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol for IPv6)
  • homenet - automatically configuring (mainly) IPv6 routed home networks
  • HTTP/2.0
  • MPTCP (Multi-Path TCP)
  • NETCONF/YANG, I2RS, OpenDaylight
  • NETVC and Daala
  • OpenWSN/6TiSCH: implementing the Internet of (Important) Things
  • RIOT (OS for internet of things)
  • RPKI
  • SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol)
  • SFC in OpenDaylight
  • SPUD (Substrate Protocol Underneath Datagrams)

 

Complete descriptions for all technologies included in the hackathon are located on the IETF 93 Meeting Wiki:

https://www.ietf.org/registration/MeetingWiki/wiki/93hackathon

 

The Cisco DevNet team looks forward to seeing you in Prague as we advance the pace of open standards through running code and open source. If you missed out on this one, mark your calendar now for the IETF 94 Hackathon in Yokohama, October 31 - November 1, 2015.

eckelcu

IETF 93 Hackathon

Posted by eckelcu May 22, 2015

The Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) is holding a Hackathon at IETF 93 to encourage developers to discuss, collaborate and develop utilities, ideas, sample code and solutions that show practical implementations of IETF standards.  Cisco DevNet, which brought the first ever IETF Hackathon at IETF 92 in Dallas is fully committed to an even more successful event at IETF 93 in Prague.

 

When: Saturday July 18 and Sunday July 19

Where: Hilton Prague, Room TBD

Sponsored By: Cisco DevNet

 

Signup for the Hackathon: https://www.ietf.org/registration/ietf93/hackathonregistration.py

More information can be found here: http://ietf.org/hackathon/93-hackathon.html

Keep up to date by subscribing to: https://www.ietf.org/mailman/listinfo/hackathon

 

The Hackathon is free to attend but limited to 100 attendees.

Currently the technologies that will be focused on include:

  • BIER (Bit Index Explicit Replication)
  • HTTP/2.0
  • NETCONF/YANG, I2RS, OpenDaylight
  • NETVC and Daala
  • RIOT (OS for internet of things)
  • SCTP (Stream Control Transmission Protocol)
  • SFC in OpenDaylight
  • SPUD (Substrate Protocol Underneath Datagrams)

 

Descriptions and information regarding the technologies for the hackathon are located on the IETF 93 Meeting Wiki:

https://www.ietf.org/registration/MeetingWiki/wiki/93hackathon

 

Don’t see anything that interests you? Feel free to add your preferred technology to the list, sign up as its champion and show up to work on it. Note: you must login to the wiki to add content. If you do add a new technology, we strongly suggest that you send email to the hackathon@ietf.org list to let others know. You may generate interest in your technology, and find other people who want to contribute to it.

 

To request a wiki account, please click on the “login” button on the bottom right corner of the page, and choose “register.”

If you need a new password please click on the “login” button on the bottom right corner of the page and choose “Send new password.”

 

The Cisco DevNet team looks forward to seeing you in Prague as we advance the pace of open standards through running code and open source.

The first ever IETF Hackathon was held March 21-22, the weekend before IETF 92 in Dallas, TX. It was a late addition to the conference schedule, answering the call to action from Engineering CTO and Chief Architect Dave Ward’s talk at IETF 91, Open Standards, Open Source, Open Loop. Cisco’s DevNet team teamed up with IETF leaders to put the event together in short order. Stated goals included bringing running code back into the IETF, bridging the gap between open source and open standards, and introducing more developers and young people to the IETF. It was a huge success by these and other measures, as evident by the announcement at the plenary session of another hackathon at IETF 93 in Prague.

 

The hackathon featured six technology areas, representing a mix of existing IETF working groups, proposals with BoFs (Birds of a Feather sessions) occurring later in the week, and a combination of new and established open source projects.

 

  • BIER (Bit Index Explicit Replication)
  • NETVC and Daala (Internet Video Code)
  • I2RS/OpenDaylight + NETCONF/YANG
  • Services Function Chaining (SFC) in OpenDaylight (ODL)
  • SPUD (Substrate Protocol Underneath Datagrams)
  • STUN/DISCUSS (Differentiated prIorities and Status Code-points Using Stun Signaling

hackathon:n.jpg?cache=&w=900&h=596

 

We kicked things off with a series of brief presentations that introduced each technology and proposed sample projects. Participants self organized into teams and started hacking. The knowledge transfer and productivity that ensued was astounding. People were so engrossed in their projects that lunch sat untouched for half an hour. Fresh cookies provided as an afternoon snack did not distract, a scenario unimaginable to most IETF veterans.

Nearly everyone stayed for dinner and many worked well beyond the advertised closing time of 21:00, with the last few groups of dedicated developers being kicked out over an hour later.

image003.jpg

There was no loss of enthusiasm the next morning, with many people arriving before the advertised start time of 09:00. A few new faces arrived, their previously established travel plans or airline strikes not allowing them to participate the previous day.  They were welcomed, plugged into existing teams and started contributing.

image005.jpg

By mid Sunday afternoon, teams switched gears to prepare and deliver brief presentations in which they shared what they had accomplished to their peers and a set of esteemed judges - Jari Arkko, Richard Barnes, and Mark Nottingham. Following the presentations, the judges conferred to determine the winners. At stake were bragging rights plus tech goodies that included Raspberry Pis, Infiniter green laser pointers, and Kill-o-Watt power meters.

 

The set of projects included the following:

  • BIER powered HOMENET multicast routingimage007.jpg
  • NETVC/Daala, new contributor added, video analyzer createdimage009.jpg
  • OpenDaylight ietf-syslog model used to configure Linux rsyslog daemon
  • OpenDaylight developer VM created, used, and refined to provide complete development environment for I2RS, SFC, ietfsyslog project, and others projects involving OpenDaylighthackathon:a19.jpg?cache=&w=900&h=600
  • SFC traceroute draft implemented, revealing error in the specification fixed by a new version of draft
  • NETCONF integration for SFChackathon:a18.jpg?cache=&w=900&h=600
  • YANG model inventory; tool that produces RFC/internet draft template from YANG modelhackathon:a16.jpg?cache=&w=900&h=600
  • SPUDlib open source project contributors increased 200%
  • SPUD prototype draft implemented, used as input in BoF later in weekimage011.jpg
  • STUN/DISCUSS demo createdhackathon:a17.jpg?cache=&w=900&h=600

The IETF meeting wiki contains additional information, links to presentations and projects, and more photos. Lastly, here are quotes from hackathon participants:

 

Hariharan Ananthakrishnan, Packet Design –

"My personal thanks for helping out in the IETF Hackathon and plugging me to right group to contribute. I should say I had good time hacking as a first time IETFer"

 

Sunil Vallamkonda, F5 –

"I got to learn a lot and meet talented folks. I do not know why such an event never happened till 2015, it should have part of IETF since day one."

 

We may not be able to change the past, but we will continue to shape the future of the IETF, including another hackathon at IETF 93 in Prague!

 

image013.png

Photos © Internet Society 2015. Used with permission.

Photos also provided by Olaf Kolkman IETF 92 - an album on Flickr

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