"IoT, The Oppressed Project

We are now in the era of IoT “Internet of Things”. It’s a concept that not only has the potential to impact how we live but also how we work. And as things become more connected, people become more concerned about their security and privacy. I have gone through a lot of technical conversation about IoT and realized how paranoid people are about their connected devices and appliances.

Why paranoid?

The future Internet will be an IPv6 network interconnecting traditional computers and a large number of smart objects or networks such as Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). By 2020 there will be over 26 Billion connected devices and some estimate this number to be more than 100 Billion connected devices. This includes mobile phones, Smart TVs, washing machines, wearable devices, Microwave, Fridges, headphones, door locks, garage door openers, scales, home alarms, hubs for multiple devices, remote power outlets and almost anything else you can think of like your car and airplane jet engines.

Ways of securing the traditional Internet networks have been established and tested. The IoT is a hybrid network of the Internet and resource-constrained networks, and it is, therefore, reasonable to explore the options of using security mechanisms standardized for the Internet in the IoT.

What will we do about managing the usernames and passwords of every single connected device? What about our privacy? What if some hacker was able to control our video cameras? More and more questions are being asked and more security concerns are being escalated. Do we really have to be paranoid about IoT?"

Read More>>

Blog Written by:

Timothy Chou | February 17, 2015 at 9:10 am PST

 

 

While cloud computing is based on a number of technology innovations, I’m going to write for the non-technical person who I think needs to understand this major shift.  In the end, cloud computing will affect every business, every industry.  I’ll start this blog by sharing a story.

A few years ago, I was in a meeting with six CIOs of one of the largest healthcare providers. I asked each a question as they introduced themselves: “What are you working on?”

The first CIO, Bill, replied, “I’m working on a strategy to move to cloud.”

Next, I asked Mary, “What do you do?” Mary also said she was working on a strategy to move the cloud.

We got through every one of them and every one of them had the same answer.

I asked, “So what does that mean, working on a strategy to move to the cloud?”

They collectively said, “We’re really not sure, but we’re working on it.”

I wasn’t actually there to talk to them about cloud computing, but I said, “Give me 10 to 15 minutes to help you think about what it might mean to move to the cloud.”

I’d like to share an abbreviated view of this discussion in this blog, beginning with reviewing my cloud-computing framework.

Cloud Computing Framework

Cisco in the cloud

We’re all using consumer application cloud services, such as Twitter, Facebook, and eBay.  Nobody buys or uses consumer applications in any other way. What some of you don’t know is there are now many business application cloud services, including CRM, marketing, HR, financial and supply chain applications. All these applications use the original cloud – the network cloud.  Once upon a time corporations built their own networks. Nobody does that today. Everyone buys a network cloud service from any number of vendors.

The guys from the network business realized that since they put their switches and routers in cold rooms located in buildings that weren’t on fault lines and had big guard dogs out front, why not let people add compute and storage into these data centers by offering data center cloud services?

Then, several years ago, Amazon led the industry by providing compute and storage cloud services.  While it requires technology to implement, their innovation was an entirely new business model.  Finally, if you are going to build new applications you’d be wise to consider a new generation of software development cloud services.

And in the end, whether new cloud based business applications or existing ones, you’ll want to use operations management cloud services to manage the security, availability, performance and change of the applications to reduce cost and improve reliability.

7 Ways to Move to the Cloud

move to the cloud

Given this cloud computing framework, let me now describe seven ways a company can move to the cloud.

  • Move to a new network cloud service, which has lower cost and higher bandwidth.
  • Move to a new data center cloud service and move into a room that has colder air and bigger guard dogs.
  • Move your application to a new compute and storage cloud service and let someone else manage the security, availability, and performance of the compute and storage.
  • Move to a new software development cloud service and build the application you’re thinking of moving.  This might sound unreasonable but with new tools this is more possible than ever.
  • Use a new operations management cloud service to manage the existing applications, meaning to manage the security, performance, and availability of that application.
  • Have the vendor manage the application they sold you. In other words, the ISV that first sold you its on-premises application could now deliver that application as a service delivered and managed by the ISV.
  • Finally, replace that application with a new generation of what I’ll call a ‘born in the cloud’ application cloud service.

So for my six CIOs I recommended they take their entire portfolio of applications and decide which of the seven they would implement.  Merge the answers into one plan so you can move from a strategic intent to a tactical plan.

And For More Information

For more information, and many more examples of how businesses moved to the cloud, check out my book on Cloud Computing: Operation Efficiency, where Moving to the Cloud is discussed in more detail in a TED-sized chapter in this book.

The Enterprise Monthly Feature Preview is a monthly webinar hosted by the Enterprise Market Strategy Group.  This webinar series is limited to Cisco and Partner account teams.  Full details for this monthly event are below, including registration links and information on the February 6th, 2015 session:  Prime Infrastructure DataCenter.

 

The goal of the Enterprise Monthly Feature Preview is to have different SMEs (Subject Matter Experts) join us each month to provide a deep-dive into new features and technologies within the Enterprise Management space for Cisco and Partner account teams.

 

This monthly event will be presented over WebEx and include a slide presentation, as well as a live demo.  We host one session each month at 8am PST.  The session is recorded and posted online for access to those who are not able to attend live.  Our next Enterprise Monthly Feature Preview is on Friday, February 6, 2015 and will cover:

 

Prime Infrastructure DataCenter

In this session you will learn about the new Prime Infrastructure DataCenter. We will have Sowmya Sattanathan (Product Manager) presenting an overview and demo of the new DataCenter offering for Prime Infrastructure. We will be covering key features/differentiators and details which will enable you to share the same with your customers.

 

Presenter:         Sowmya Sattanathan – Prime Infrastructure Product Manager

 

 

Registration for the February 6th Enterprise Monthly Feature Preview is available online:

 

Date:    Friday, February 6, 2015

Time:    8am PST // 5pm CEST

Link:     https://cisco.webex.com/cisco/onstage/g.php?MTID=eb44205fc678f751dc00f5aeacb969fd3

 

 

Questions related to the Enterprise Monthly Feature Preview can be directed to prime-demo-series@cisco.com or Chris McGuyer.

 

 

Chris McGuyer

Business Development Manager

Enterprise Market Strategy Group

cmcguyer@cisco.com

Hi Everyone,

 

Today I was messing around with the look and feel of the homepage and sub-pages on this community.  I'd like to make this community useful and fun for the users, so I'd love to know what you come her for.  Are you looking for help on figuring out some product? Are you hoping to learn about the Borderless Networks architecture? Do you have questions on BYOD, Big Data, or IPv6?

 

I've set up a sub-community for the Ike videos and some links to webinars.  We're trying something new, we've created a channel for Enterprise Networks in BrightTalk.  Do you use it? I've added in a link to our BrightTalk community to the right* if you'd like to check out some of the recent webinars we've done on Conquer the Cloud.

 

Thanks!

Lauren

 

* EDITED: Apparently, embed code (HTML & Java) don't work on the blogs.  Bollocks.

Our  blog is an awesome place to find out what's happening with Borderless Networks!

Filter Blog

By date:
By tag: